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Review: Washington Performing Arts Presents Chris Botti at The Kennedy Center

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Washington Performing Arts Produces an Eclectic and Entertaining Musical Evening with Chris Botti

I went to a Chris Botti concert and Cirque du Soleil and Led Zepplin broke out. Saturday night’s Washington Performing Arts concert by Grammy-winning trumpeter Chris Botti was eclectic, entertaining, and downright electrifying.

A mesmerizing trumpet player, Botti is also a storyteller who thrives on audience interaction. Arguably one of the top jazz trumpeters in America today, Botti surrounds himself with some of the best musicians in the music industry, proving himself a gracious band leader by spotlighting every member of his dynamic band. Snazzily dressed, on time, and in the groove, Chris Botti’s band continues to share an infectious joy in making music together, even after 12 years of nearly nonstop road appearances.

When I Fall In Love, a reimagined and reinvigorated take on a classic, highlighted the talent and intensity these musicians bring to their work. The fun was infectious as Botti on trumpet, Geoffrey Keezer on piano, Richie Goods on bass, Ben Butler on electric guitar, and Lee Pearson on drums swapped leads and tempos and created magic in The Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Goods turned in an impressive bass solo on an amped up Venice. Another highlight among highlights was Botti’s smooth and haunting duet with guitarist Ben Butler on Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah.

DC native Sy Smith blew the roof off The Kennedy Center’s Concert Hall with her rendition of Burt Bacharach’s The Look of Love. The unison scatting by Smith and Botti was nothing short of phenomenal, and Smith emphatically proved that it really is possible for a human voice to replicate a trumpet line (even a trumpet line as smooth, sustained and multi-octaved as Botti’s). In a scene-stealing turn, Smith showed off her elegant vocals with versatility, tossing off sultry jazz and diva pop vocals with ease and assurance.

One of my favorite songs of the night, The Very Thought of You, brought Botti and Smith into the audience for a sultry duet that morphed into a rock concert with hot guitar solos by Ben Butler and Richie Goods, as well as intense solos by Lee Pearson on drums and Geoffrey Keezer and Ben Stivers on piano and keyboards respectively. There is nothing this group of musicians can’t do.

Lee Pearson’s infectious grin and enthusiastic drumming stole the show numerous times, particularly in You Don’t Know What Love Is, where his athletic and flamboyant drum solo sent drumsticks flying at the head of bassist Richie Goods, leading to much good-natured joking the rest of the evening. Pearson showed himself a drummer par excellence with a show stopping solo featuring his six year old son, Lee, at the end of the show.

Concert violinist Sandy Cameron proved the truth of Shakespeare’s lines: “though she be but little, she is fierce.” Acrobatic, athletic, and commanding, Cameron’s powerful violin playing approached the realm of performance art. Cameron and Botti teamed up for a heartwrenching and soulful Emmanuel. On a virtuoso solo turn that morphed into a raucous Kashmir with the band, Cameron brought the crowd to its feet with an electrifying performance that showed the full range of her skill.

Saturday’s concert at The Kennedy Center proved yet again why Chris Botti and his fantastic band are some of the most talented and entertaining musicians on the concert circuit today.

Read the article at DC Metro Theater Arts

Java Jazz Festival 2016 Ends on a High Note With David Foster, Chris Botti & Sting

Musisi Sting (kiri) beraksi dan berkolaborasi dengan Chris Botti (kanan) di atas panggung Java Jazz Festival 2016 di JiExpo Kemayoran, Jakarta, 5 Maret 2016. FOTO: BeritaSatu Photo/Danung Arifin

Sting performs with Chris Botti at the 2016 Java Jazz Festival at JIExpo Kemayoran, Central Jakarta, Mar. 5, 2016. PHOTO: BeritaSatu Photo/Danung Arifin

Jakarta. The pouring rain outside on Sunday evening (06/03) did not dampen the festival-goers’ spirit to catch two special shows by David Foster as well as Chris Botti and Sting, which marked the final night of the weekend-long 2016 Java Jazz Festival, which took place at the Jakarta International Expo Kemayoran, Central Jakarta.

The Canadian composer and mega-producer Foster hit the main stage with his band at 6.30 p.m. Although the hall wasn’t nearly as packed as the night before — when Foster also performed a similar set — the show’s atmosphere was as charming.

Berget Lewis, a Dutch jazz singer, stunned the audience with her powerful vocal, singing classics like Chaka Khan’s “Through the Fire” and Toni Braxton’s “Unbreak My Heart” — both of which were produced by Foster.

Settling himself behind a grand piano, Foster also led his band to play some of his favorite songs, such as “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” and “Glory of Love.”

For some Indonesians, the composer has become a familiar figure, having held numerous concerts in Jakarta in the last several years. Still, Foster’s presence at the festival last weekend only further proved his ever-lasting musical career.

Speaking of relevance, British rock star Sting also demonstrated his when he collaborated with the Grammy-winning trumpeter, Chris Botti, in the festival’s grand finale at around 10 a.m.

Botti started his set playing solo, introducing the crowd to his jazz arrangements of such songs as “Deborah’s Theme” and “When I Fall in Love.”

“It’s so nice to be back at the world-famous Java Jazz!” he exclaimed between his virtuosic performances that managed to cast a spell on the audience.

He then discovered that Foster, fresh from playing his own show, was watching him front the front row. “It’s a little nerve-racking to see David Foster here,” Botti laughed. “If he looks a little sour, then I know something I play might be off!”

American violinist Caroline Campbell was then invited to the stage and played “Emmanuel” and “You Don’t Know What Love Is” with Botti. The ululating violin sound she masterly produced united beautifully with the trumpeter’s soaring and cascading performance — presenting an avalanche of melodies that left the audience spellbound.

During “The Very Thought of You,” Botti unexpectedly stepped down from the stage and played among the crowd, dedicating the song to one lucky audience member.

Not long after, it was time for the night’s main course. “Make some noise for the one and only Sting!” Botti proclaimed to loud cheers.

The former Police frontman, still looking fit and youthful at 64, instantly launched into his hits from the 1980s and 1990s, like “If I Ever Lose My Faith in You” and “Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic,” with Sting’s fans in the audience joyously sang along to the lyrics.

“I’m overjoyed to play with Chris and his band for the second evening,” Sting told the crowd before he played “Seven Days,” which Botti dedicated to “the musicologists in the audience.”

The combination of Sting’s trademark vocal and Botti’s trumpet maneuver made for an amazing spectacle that night, tackling beloved songs like “Roxanne,” “Desert Love,” and “The World Is Running Down.” Even Botti asked Eric Benet, who sat in the front row, to sing “Let’s Stay Together” on the stage — certainly one of the festival’s highlights this year.

The grand show finally ended around midnight, when the duo performed Sting’s 1987 slow-burning hit, “Fragile,” leaving the audience soaked in amazement.

Read more at Jakartaglobe.com

 

 

 

‘Message in a Botti’

Sting_Botti_Manila 2016_Pocholo Concepcion

Philippine Daily Inquirer

Photo and Story by Pocholo Concepcion

If Madonna in MOA Arena was a spectacle, Chris Botti and Sting in concert on March 3 at the Marriott Grand Ballroom was an exceptionally euphoric musical experience.

This was one special gig that featured one of the most brilliant contemporary jazz trumpet artists back-to-back with one of rock ‘n’ roll’s most distinctive voices who happened to have dabbled in jazz early in his career and went on to explore it after the breakup of his band, The Police.

Botti and Sting had one thing in common, a fine taste for musicianship, which was on full display at the concert. It was Botti’s show, but when Sting walked in after a few songs, it seemed like Botti gave way to let Sting’s Filipino fans have the time of their lives singing and grooving to “Message in a Bottle,” Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic,” “Roxanne,” among other Police classics plus several of his solo nuggets, “Fields of Gold,” “Desert Rose” and his first song for the night, “If I Ever Lose My Faith in You.”

Nonetheless Botti proved a point early in the show, that his mastery of the trumpet, as Sting himself told Inquirer in a recent email interview, brings the instrument to “its most poetic, vocal-like quality.”

Botti’s band, led by pianist extraordinaire Geoffrey Keezer, was smoking hot–tripping the light fantastic with bursts of bebop and all-around excellence.

In the end, the music lifted the crowd so high and energized that a number of fans–including the vacationing Los Angeles-based Bubut Posadas and her college friend Wing Inductivo–unwittingly found themselves just an arm’s length from Sting and taking all the selfies and videos their phone cameras could allow. No burly bouncers to stop them.

It was such a fun night that called to mind the clever remark of a friend, DJ Par Sallan, who said that this concert could’ve been dubbed “Message in a Botti.” CDG
Read more: http://entertainment.inquirer.net/191469/message-in-a-botti#ixzz41xOi3MPB

Chris Botti: Sting’s belief in me is why I have a career

The Philippine Daily Inquirer by Pocholo Concepcion

Like Madonna’s two-night concerts last week, Chris Botti’s coming gig with Sting on March 3 at the Marriott Grand Ballroom has pricey tickets.

That’s understandable, considering you’ll be watching two major artists in one show.

This marks the first time Botti and Sting will perform together in Manila.

They first worked together in 1999, when Botti was invited as a featured soloist on Sting’s Brand New Day tour. Botti and Sting recently had an e-mail chat with Inquirer Lifestyle.

Chris, you studied and worked hard as a musician before achieving success. Can you recall a few instances which you consider turning points in your journey, and why?

Meeting Sting, by far. It’s his friendship that I’m most proud of in my life. If I were to look at any accomplishment or association, by a long shot it’s my friendship with him. We’re family now, and his belief in me is the reason why I have a career, I can trace it to that. We get along so well and have become so close; to have such respect and admiration for someone and have it returned is truly amazing.

What he does and the way he conducts his life, I try in many ways to emulate. It’s based on being on the road a lot, the dedication you get from music, performing the music, landing in a city and getting straight to yoga, maintaining the practice – all those things that I have picked up from him have helped me enormously in my career.

When I was in his band, he gave me so much exposure by doing solos with me. But it was his urging that really made me, and the opportunity to be his opening act throughout the world that really launched my career in a big-time way. He’s always been my biggest supporter, best friend, and my big brother, really.

If you were to advise young musicians who want to widen their knowledge of jazz, which album would you recommend that they start with, and why?

I can’t say I have just one album I’d recommend. I’m always listening to Miles Davis’ “My Funny Valentine” (a live album recorded during a concert at the Philharmonic Hall of Lincoln Center, New York, on Feb. 12, 1964, and released Feb. 23, 1965 on the Columbia label); Keith Jarrett’s “The Melody At Night, With You” (recorded at his home studio in 1998, released on ECM in 1999); and “Frank Sinatra Sings For Only the Lonely” (a collection of torch songs, released September 1958 on Capitol).

You and Sting have played in the Philippines on separate occasions, not together onstage. How are you preparing for this show?

I honestly have had many people, like my friends, come to me and go, “Chris, I’m coming to your show tomorrow, I have never seen you play before, so is it just you and the trumpet?” They don’t realize it’s a night with an incredible jazz group, which moves around from classical to jazz to pop, and you have all these lines being blurred and it’s incredibly fun! Afterwards, people say, “I had no idea it would be like that.” We crafted it over many years of trial and a lot of errors.

I obsess about my show all day because I want it to be musically entertaining and also musically “high-end” for the fans… It’s not lost on me that we have fans who buy tickets, take a night off and come to the show. It means so much.

What is the one guilty pleasure that you look forward to whenever you’re home or on holiday?

Honestly, I’m not very good at relaxing and I don’t really go on holiday. I’m a bit of a workaholic, although I don’t view it as work. I’ve been doing the same thing since I was 9 years old; it’s just that now I get paid to do it, it’s awesome!

I practice yoga and enjoy playing chess, but being on tour and playing for my fans is what I look forward to every day. We’re on the road 300 days a year and people ask, “How do you have a life?” I don’t, but I wouldn’t change anything.

Sting, in the past, you’ve collaborated with a number of prominent musicians, lately with Paul Simon and Peter Gabriel. What’s the greatest insight you’ve gained from everything?

I’ve been fortunate to work with many supremely talented musicians over the years. I tend to surround myself with people whom I can learn something from, and my strategy has always been to play with musicians better than myself. I maintain a childlike curiosity about music, along with a sense that I need to work at it. I never want to stop learning.

What’s it like to perform with Chris Botti?

Chris brings the trumpet to its most poetic, vocal-like quality. He’s altogether unique in that respect. His sound provides a compelling complement to my vocals and it’s always a true joy to perform with him.

You’ve played and experimented with practically all kinds of music. Which genre would you say is closest to your heart, and why?

I enjoy the creative freedom I have and the ability to do what interests me. I get bored pretty easily, and so I always like to do something new and that is hopefully surprising. I think my audience has come to expect that element of surprise.

This will be the first time that you and Botti will be playing in the Philippines. What excites you about it?

It gives you a chance to show an audience you’re a real human being; you still sweat and sometimes make mistakes. That close up, everything’s kind of human, which I like. I still get a buzz from being on stage. There’s no way to describe the feeling of playing for people who are pleased to see you. That’s something you can’t be blasé about.

What new things have you learned from aging?

I tend to live in the moment and don’t really think too much about the future or necessarily about the past. I recently celebrated my 64th birthday, and I’m glad that I’m my age. It’s fun because I have both sides of it – a bit of wisdom and the energy of a younger man.

 

Live review: Chris Botti and Sting are a solid double act at The Dubai Jazz Festival

The National by Saeed Saeed

If you are going to have Sting waiting in the wings as a special guest, then your show needs to be strong enough to starve off the anticipation. Chris Botti did a reasonable job of that with his Dubai Jazz Festival performance on Thursday night.

Joined by a near dozen strong backing band, the popular American trumpeter serenaded the packed crowd to an evening of jazz standards and reinterpretations of pop classics.

However, the Botti on stage is a different performer to his multimillion selling albums.

Where those records were nocturnal affairs and a soundtrack of choice for dinner parties, the 53 year old was much looser live as he indulged in several feats of dazzling improvisations among arrangements ranging from big band to straight out rock.

In the case of the latter, their take on Led Zeppelin’s Kashmir packed a real punch with Botti’s Spanish influenced tones adding extra pomp to the affair.

At times, one felt that Botti and his crew were trying too hard with the extended rock and blues jams — it almost felt like he was trying to justify himself for being the arena act that he now is.

It was when he dialled things down that Botti was in his element. His thoughtful take of Billie Holiday’s The Very Thought of You, featuring vocalist Sy Smith, was beautiful.

So was his treatment of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah; where the original revelled in mystery, Botti’s take was more refined and melodic.

It set the scene well for the arrival of Sting, who sauntered on to the stage over an hour into the set.

He began his mini solo set (Botti left the stage) with If I Ever Lose My Faith, demonstrating why the 64-year-old vocals remaining one of the best in the business.

By the time he breezed through English Man in New York and Message in A Bottle, one feared that Botti was totally overshadowed.

For all the talk of Sting’s ego, however, the rock icon was a gracious support act to Botti when the latter returned on stage.

One could sense the mutual appreciation between the two when they performed a joint set of Sting classics and covers.

When it came to the former, the laid back, jazzed-up vibe of Seven Dayswas a treat. However, their take on the Frank Sinatra classic In The Wee Small Hours of the Morning was a flop — the ache and heart break of the original was criminally replaced with Disneyesque schmaltzy arrangements.

That said, the set was varied enough to keep fans of both artists satisfied.

Special Events featuring Sting

Botti-Sting Banner

 

We just finished rehearsals today and I’m very excited to be heading out for a group of special performances featuring my good friend Sting.  We’re so looking forward to performing in Dubai, Georgia, Manila and Jakarta with 2 1/2 hours of music featuring our most popular songs!

February 25th – Dubai, UAE

February 27th and 28th – Tbilisi, Georgia

March 3rd – Manila, Philippines

March 5th and 6th – Jakarta, Indonesia

Go to my tour page for more details!

NBC’S Annual ‘Christmas In Rockefeller Center’ Celebrates The Music Of The Holidays Live On Wednesday, Dec 2nd

NBC will celebrate the lighting of the world’s most famous Christmas tree with “Christmas in Rockefeller Center®” on Wednesday, Dec. 2 (8-9 p.m. ET).

NBC’s “Today” anchors Matt Lauer, Savannah Guthrie, Al Roker and Natalie Morales will host the live broadcast from New York City’s Rockefeller Center, which will showcase spectacular holiday performances from Sting, Mary J. Blige, Andrea Bocelli, The Band Perry, Andy Grammer, Carly Rae Jepsen, Pentatonix, Band of Merrymakers, and music legend James Taylor, featuring world-renowned trumpeter Chris Botti. The evening will also include a special performance by the Rockettes.

The 83rd annual holiday extravaganza will feature a 78-foot tall Norway Spruce from Gardiner, N.Y. It is approximately 80 years old and weighs approximately 10 tons.

Once again, “Green Is Universal,” NBCUniversal’s sustainability initiative in partnership with the Arbor Day Foundation, will kick off its annual tree-planting campaign during the “Christmas in Rockefeller Center” broadcast. This year, viewers can “GIF’t a Tree” to a national or state park or forest, by using #GIFtATree or visiting www.greenisuniversal.com to create and share an animated holiday tree GIF. Each action will contribute to the Arbor Day Foundation’s tree planting efforts, funded by a $25,000 donation from NBCUniversal.

Prior to the primetime telecast, an additional live hour of the special will be broadcast on select NBC stations (7-8 p.m. ET). Check local listings.

Trumpeter Chris Botti and musical friends enchant Uptown crowd

By L Pierce Carson, Napa Valley RegisterBotti Napa 2015

World traveling trumpeter Chris Botti stopped off in Napa last week with his latest musical ensemble.

The generous two-hour-plus show that Botti and eight colleagues presented to a full house of fans at the Uptown Theatre turned out to be an absolute corker. The tightly knit, wildly talented ensemble was, as the saying goes, hitting on all cylinders.

As she usually does, violinist and Stanford grad Caroline Campbell raised eyebrows and gooseflesh. The classically trained artist caresses with dreamy ballads, then gets down when the tempo is turned up.

We’ve heard vocalist Sy Smith before but no one’s ever been better at delivering the Al Green hit “Let’s Stay Together” … except for Al Green, of course.

Danville’s George Komsky, offering the operatic “Italia” and “Time to Say Goodbye” with his warm, soaring voice, let Napans know why he’s ranked one of the best tenors in the nation.

Pianist Geoffrey Keezer — who earned his stripes as a young man with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers — dazzled us with not only his arrangements but also the improvisational solos contributed throughout the evening.

And who in the audience was not blown away by the new addition to the rhythm section, drummer Lee Pearson? Not only has he backed such acclaimed jazzmen as Roy Ayers and Ronnie Laws as well as singer Erykah Badu, Pearson was part of a world tour with Savion Glover’s Tony Award-winning Broadway show, “Bring in Da’ Noise, Bring in Da’ Funk” from 2002-2003.

Commenting on the newest band member, Botti points out that Pearson is “a very unusual combination of jaw-dropping chops, showmanship and finesse.” And that’s just what Pearson’s magnificent solo near the end of last week’s concert was — jaw-dropping. I suspect Gene Krupa might well have been smilin’ from on high.

And then there’s three more top-shelf guys contributing to the mix — bassist Richie Goods, guitarist Ben Butler and keyboardist Andy Ezrin.

For those who think Chris Botti is all about dreamy smooth jazz ballads, they need to catch a live performance. When Chris and his trumpet aren’t serving up “Emmanuel” or “Hallelujah,” they’re taking the lead on sizzling arrangements of Tin Pan Alley classics or breaking new ground with contemporary R&B hits. A terrific bandleader with an ear for talent, Botti is equally at ease with straight-ahead jazz, turning his bandmates loose for numerous crowd-pleasing solos.

By now, Botti is a familiar face in the valley, his trumpet a welcome and enjoyable sound. He’s played the Mondavi summer festival three times, appeared at Far Niente Winery as part of Festival del Sole and graced the Lincoln Theater and Napa Valley Opera House stages. And now he’s becoming a regular at the Uptown Theatre.

Botti is a native of Oregon who was born in Portland, raised in Corvallis, and spent two years of his childhood growing up in Italy. His earliest musical influence was his mother, a classically trained pianist and part-time piano teacher. He began playing trumpet at age 9 and, after hearing a recording of Miles Davis playing “My Funny Valentine,” realized the instrument was his key to “doing something meaningful with my life.”

Since the 2004 release of his critically acclaimed “When I Fall in Love,” Botti has become the largest selling American jazz instrumentalist, according to Billboard. In 2013, Botti won the Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Album for his “Impressions” recording.

Botti’s fans couldn’t have been happier that the 53-year-old trumpeter chose to play in Napa on his birthday. It was a night to remember.

Read the full concert review here at napavalleyregister.com

Symphony review | Trumpeter Chris Botti thrills at first Pops

06192015_1AA_Picnic Bottie_LK_02

By Gary Budzak
For The Columbus Dispatch • Saturday June 20, 2015
Photo Credit: Leah Klafczynski / Dispatch

One of the Columbus Symphony’s favorite guests, trumpeter Chris Botti, turned in a typically top-notch performance Friday night in the Columbus Commons. However, the surprise of the evening was the weather — it didn’t rain.

Maybe it was the presence of WBNS-TV meteorologist Chris Bradley, telling us to keep our fingers crossed. It could have been CSO Board Chair Lisa Barton’s thanking the audience for braving the weather. Or perhaps it was what Botti called maestro Albert-George Schram’s good relationship with the man upstairs that kept the elements at bay. Then again, how could it rain on the opening Picnic with the Pops concert of the season?

Although the Commons was surrounded by clouds, it turned out to be a beautiful evening, completely dry with a slight breeze. The only negative of the night was too many sirens could be heard during the concert.

And what a concert it was. Unlike most pops shows, Botti and his band performed on both halves of the concert. In addition, the symphony played throughout, and could be heard well.

Botti, 52, is perhaps the most popular instrumentalist performing today. He’s equally at home playing a jazz solo, an operatic piece or a pop standard. While some of the audience may like Botti for his good looks, others favor his sound. When Botti plays his 1939 Martin Committee handcraft trumpet, it sounds more like a flugelhorn. He can get a strong but sad tone from the horn that redeems some of his smoother tunes.

Trumpeters aplenty have chops, but Botti also has the personality that allows a club or lawn audience to get into the show. He’s no shoe gazer — Botti breaks jazz down for first-timers. He said they play the melody, “the Taylor Swift part,” then on the solo “sometimes we go off to another planet.” Later, he went out into the audience, playing trumpet for people in front tables. Many cellphone photos were taken.

The other thing that made this a stellar show was the talent surrounding Botti. As a bandleader, he likes having people who play at his high level by his side and sharing the spotlight with them.

First was pianist Taylor Eigsti, who Botti said looked like Bradley Cooper and played like Bill Evans. Then there was expressive violinist Lucia Micarelli, who shifted from pathos to Kashmir without missing a beat. Botti also gave some love to bassist Richie Goods on Flamenco Sketches; Ben Butler (who may have been best on the opening En Aranjuez Con Tu Amor, although he got more cheers for the Iron Man riff); tenor George Komsky, who proved a ringer for Andrea Bocelli on Italia and Time to Say Goodbye. Last but not least, Botti made sure we heard a lot of trumpet-imitating singer Sy Smith and powerhouse drummer Lee Pearson. The latter’s long solo included balancing a stick on top of his head as he played.

Read the full concert review here at dispatch.com